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Pennycress biodiesel news:


Great Lakes Echo

New crop could raise income, produce biofuel, limit climate change, save soil
Great Lakes Echo
A new crop could add a new harvesting season for farmers in the Midwest, one that happens during the spring rather than the traditional fall. Pennycress is planted in August or September, toward the end of the corn season. It continues growing until ...


St. Louis Public Radio

Pennycress, a common weed in Missouri, could be the next big thing in biofuel innovation
St. Louis Public Radio
Pennycress, for example, is a “weed” that Missourians can find growing road-side. Jerry Steiner is the CEO of Arvegenix, a local company leading the development of Pennycress oil for use in biodiesel fuel. He said that plants like pennycress can fill a ...

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STLtoday.com

Pennycress startup Arvegenix raises $2.4 million
STLtoday.com
Kristine Menn, greenhouse co-ordinator for Arvegenix, pollenates the female part of a field pennycress flower on Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, at the company's laboratory in the Danforth Plant Science Center. Pennycress is a winter-growing weed with seeds ...


Biodiesel Magazine

Making Pennycress Pay Off
Biodiesel Magazine
Researchers in Illinois believe they have the answer to the continuing food versus fuel debate and high commodity prices that challenge the biodiesel industry: pennycress. Their excitement stems from the ability of the plant to be transformed from a ...


CleanTechnica

Pennycress? Yep, It's the Next Big Biofuel
CleanTechnica
pennycress could be next big biofuel crop Get ready to hear a lot about pennycress biofuel this year. Pennycress sounds like a name that belongs to an unassuming little weed commonly found along roadsides – and it does – but a while back the U.S. ...


Forbes

The 25 Most Innovative Ag-Tech Startups
Forbes
When our nation was founded 241 years ago, farming was the economy's primary driver. By 1870, nearly half of the employed population held jobs in agriculture. Today, it's a $3 trillion industry - but only 2% of Americans hold a farm-oriented job. This ...


UMN News

13 UMTC students and alumni receive Fulbright Awards
UMN News
Thirteen students and alumni of the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus have been awarded grants to study and teach abroad during the 2017-18 academic year by the Fulbright U. S. Student Program. Another has been selected for the ...

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Model D

From bioswales to pennycress: How Detroit neighborhoods are going from gray to green
Model D
Detroit is inextricably linked to water; it's what gave us our name, drove our early industries, and has served as both a symbol of the city's rebirth as the river's edge reopens to human use, and as a marker of desperation with the ongoing water ...


Memphis Democrat

Greenley Research Center Field Day to Focus on Battling a Challenging Growing Season
Memphis Democrat
Field pennycress is traditionally a winter annual weed but is now being used as a biofuel and cover crop. Logan Bishop, a University of Missouri graduate student in plant, insect and microbial science, will showcase Greenley's findings on the influence ...


AG Week

VIDEO: Minnesota's AURI finds new uses for ag products
AG Week
Developing new markets for soy protein in food allergen-free soybean varieties. Evaluating the potential for pennycress oil and meal. Pennycress, a cover crop, could be a source of oil for biodiesel and meal for livestock feed. Conducting a small-scale ...

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Pennycress biodiesel companies leading the industry:

  • Innovation Fuels Currently operating a biorefinery with 950,000 barrel per year capacity in Newark, NJ, and with two test plots of pennycress growing elsewhere in the state of New Jersey; in addition to test areas throughout the States of New York and Wisconsin, intends to expand its renewable energy initiative exponentially over the next 2-3 years.
  • USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR) The lab is trying to determine agronomic parameters for pennycress production. They have the following specific research objectives: 1. Determine optimum planting depth for pennycress. 2. Evaluate effect of nitrogen on pennycress seed production. 3. Evaluate pennycress planting date. In addition, the lab website also describes their work with making methyl esters (biodiesel) from pennydress oil: "The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical properties of pennycress oil and its methyl esters for suitability as a biodiesel. Pennycress seeds were obtained from combine harvesting of wild strands using conventional combines. The seeds were cleaned by screening, aspiration and gravity table fractionation. Oil was recovered from whole seed by passing through a screw press and filtration. The oil was converted to methyl esters using a sodium methoxide catalyst in methanol. Pour point, cloud point, viscosity, flash point acid value, copper corrosion, and oxidative stability were determined on both the oil and the methyl esters using the appropriate ASTM method. The seed was found to contain 36% oil with the major fatty acid as erucic at 38.1%, and an iodine value of 115. Viscosity index (VI) of the methyl esters was 277, with a 40 deg C viscosity of 5.0 CST, and pour point and cloud points of -15 and -10 deg C, respectively. The starting oil had a VI of 222, with a 40 deg C viscosity of 39.1 CST, and pour point and cloud points of -18 and -10 deg C, respectively. As expected, the flash point of the methyl esters at 136 deg C was considerably less than the starting oil at 234 deg C. OSI of the oil at 100 deg C was 39 h and 54 h for methyl esters. The early harvest date of pennycress, compared to other winter annual oilseed crops, will make it suitable for a two-crop rotation with soybeans in most of the Midwestern U.S. In addition, the physical properties of the methyl esters indicate that continued development of the oil as a biodiesel is warranted."